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Resources outside of News in FiVe, including news sources and services provided by the government.

Choose one of the types below to narrow your choice

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News

News Research

Political Research

Consumer Resources

Government Services

Miscellaneous

Videos

News
Al Jazeera
www.AlJazeera.com
BBC News
www.BBC.com
Guardian UK
www.theguardian.com
New York Times
www.NYTimes.com
Politico
www.Politico.com
Pro Publica
www.ProPublica.org
The Hill
www.TheHill.com
News Research
FactCheck
www.FactCheck.org
Question: How can you tell when a politician is lying? Answer: His lips are moving.

Going to FactCheck is another way you can tell. So when one says inflation is up, and the other says inflation is down, go to FactCheck and find out who's the one playing loose.
FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy In Reporting)
www.FAIR.org
Reporting news should be about providing an accurate picture of what's going on, rather than quoting officials who have their own agendas. When anyone from MSNBC to the New York Times presents a distorted picture of what's going on, FAIR not only will tell you, but they'll confront them - and tell you how they responded.

Don't watch TV News or read a newspaper without checking in with FAIR. And if you're too busy to do that, sign up for their alerts and they'll e-mail the most egregious stories to you.
Kaiser Family Foundation
KFF.org
A nonprofit organization that researches and reports on national health care policy issues.
PolitiFact
www.PolitiFact.org
Similar to FactCheck. Reading both will give you a more complete picture.
The Atlantic
www.TheAtlantic.com
Washington Post Wonkblog
www.Wonkblog.com
Part of the Washington Post, the Wonkblog explains what's going on with major policy issues.
Political Research
BallotPedia
www.BallotPedia.org
An encyclopedia of politics and elections.

You can find up-to-date information about all levels of federal and state government, including election results and key public policy updates and court cases.
Center for Public Integrity
www.publicintegrity.org
A nonprofit investigative news organization focusing on corruption and conflicts of interest.
GovTrack
www.GovTrack.us
Our intent at Lobby99 is to give you the "big picture" of what's going on. If you're interested in digging deeper into anything related to Congress, visit GovTrack, where you can find details on anything from bills to representatives to voting districts. They'll even send you updates if you want.
Project Vote Smart
www.VoteSmart.org
Lobby99 gives you clear, relevant information on how your representatives acted regarding issues we advocate on.

If you want more details about any senator or representative, this is the place to do it. The Project Vote Smart web site will not only tell you how they voted on each bill, it also will tell you how they rate with major interest groups from Planned Parenthood to the National Rifle Association.
Public Laws
www.congress.gov/public-laws/
For the wonks... a list of federal laws enacted since 1973.
Consumer Resources
Annual Credit Report
www.AnnualCreditReport.com
Each of the three main credit reporting agencies is required to provide you with a free credit report each year. There are sites that make it easy, but they impose conditions such as signing up for a free trial membership (which requires a credit card). Forget to cancel the trial membership, and your card will be charged.

This is the only site authorized by the federal government that will provide this service completely free, with no conditions.
Center for Responsible Lending
www.ResponsibleLending.org
Learn about financial products and fraudulent practices.
Consumer Product Safety Commission
www.CPSC.gov
Learn about safety issues and recalls of products you use.
FTC Consumer Information
www.consumer.ftc.gov
A wide range of helpful information from personal finance to privacy to how to identify and deal with various scams and crimes.
National Motor Vehicle Title Information System
www.VehicleHistory.gov
The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is a program administered by the Department of Justice that allows consumers and law enforcement to track the history of a car.

If you're buying a used car, how can you tell if the odometer has been altered? If the car has been in a flood? Or stolen? NMVTIS can tell you (there is a small fee).

The system also helps law enforcement agencies detect stolen cars.
SaferCar
vinrcl.safercar.gov
Look up recall information about your car
Government Services
Internal Revenue Service
www.IRS.gov
Have questions about your taxes? You could wait more than 30 minutes on the phone. More likely, your call won't even be answered. See our discussion of the IRS budget.

But you can get most answers on the agency's website. You also can find other services there, including filing your federal return for free and checking the status of your return.
Miscellaneous
Numbeo
www.numbeo.com
A database on topics such as crime, traffic, and cost of living. You can compare two cities side-by-side.

The data is submitted by users. It is not from official sources. Numbeo calls itself the world's largest such database (itself a user-submitted statistic).
Restore Your Vote
www.CampaignLegal.org/restoreyourvote
Felony disenfranchisement laws differ state by state.

This tool is designed to help convicted felons determine their eligibility to restore their voting rights in their state and take steps to do so.
Snopes
www.Snopes.com
Did Barack Obama salute the flag with the wrong hand? Have terrorists acquired UPS uniforms to use for an attack? Was a silent version of The Poseidon Adventure being shown on board the Titanic at the moment it struck an iceberg? Is a missing 13-year-old girl's mom trying to find her by asking millions on the Internet?

Chances are that any outrageous claim you read on Facebook or in e-mail - no matter how authentic it might sound - simply is not true. Sometimes it's harmless. Sometimes it causes unwarranted fear.

Make a habit of checking Snopes before you pass along crazy-sounding information. Then ask yourself, why would someone make this up if they actually had something substantive to say?

(By the way... one of the above situations actually is true. You can find out by searching Snopes)
The Straight Dope
www.StraightDope.com
Videos
2-Minute Video: Healthcare
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQ5_skM9JCA
In less than 2 minutes you'll understand what healthcare policy is about, so you can engage in more meaningful discussions.
2-Minute Video: Trump and Russia
www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF33IMdkGfg&t=14s
Donald Trump has claimed on several occasions that he has no ties to Russia. This video corrects his assertions.